Regency Romance Era Thieves and Sporting Slang K

A Very Merry Chase Regency Romance Era Lexicon Of Relevant Terms

“K”

KATE. A picklock. ‘Tis a rum kate; it is a clever picklock.

KEEPING CULLY. One who keeps a mistress, as he supposes, for his own use, but really for that of the public.

KELTER. Money.

KEN. A house. A bob ken, or a bowman ken; a well-furnished house, also a house that harbours thieves. Biting the ken; robbing the house.

KEN MILLER, or KEN CRACKER. A housebreaker.

KENT-STREET EJECTMENT. To take away the street door: a method practised by the landlords in Kent-street, Southwark, when their tenants are above a fortnight’s rent in arrear.

KETCH. Jack Ketch; a general name for the finishers of the law, or hangmen.

KETTLEDRUMS. Cupid’s kettle drums; a woman’s breasts.

KETTLE OF FISH. When a person has perplexed his affairs in general, or any particular business, he is said to have made a fine kettle of fish of it.

KICKS. Breeches. A high kick; the top of the fashion. It is all the kick; it is the present mode.

KICKSEYS. Breeches.

KICKSHAWS. French dishes: corruption of quelque chose.

KID. To coax or wheedle. To inveigle.

KID LAY. Rogues who make it their business to defraud young apprentices, or errand-boys, of goods committed to their charge, by prevailing on them to execute some trifling message, pretending to take care of their parcels till they come back; these are, in cant terms, said to be on the kid lay.

KIDDEYS. Young thieves.

KIDNAPPER. One who steals or decoys children or apprentices from their parents or masters, to send them to the colonies; called also spiriting: also used for all recruiting crimps for the king’s troops, or those of the East India company, and agents for indenting servants for the plantations.

KIDNEY. Disposition, principles, humour. Of a strange kidney; of an odd or unaccountable humour. A man of a different kidney; a man of different principles.

KILL DEVIL. New still-burnt rum.

KILL PRIEST. Port wine.

KIMBAW. To trick, cheat or cozen; also to beat or to bully.

KINCHIN. A little child. Kinchin coes; orphan beggar boys, educated in thieving. Kinchin morts; young girls under the like circumstances and training. Kinchin morts, or coes in slates; beggars’ children carried at their mother’s backs in sheets. Kinchin cove; a little man.

KING’S BAD BARGAIN. One of the king’s bad bargains; a malingeror, or soldier who shirks his duty.

KING’S HEAD INN, or CHEQUER INN, IN NEWGATE STREET. The prison of Newgate.

KING’S PICTURES. Coin, money.

KINGDOM COME. He is gone to kingdom come, he is dead.

KIT. A dancing-master, so called from his kit or cittern, a small fiddle, which dancing-masters always carry about with them, to play to their scholars. The kit is also the whole of a soldier’s necessaries, the contents of his knapsack.

KITCHEN PHYSIC. Food, good meat roasted or boiled. A little kitchen physic will set him up; he has more need of a cook than a doctor.

KNACK SHOP. A toy-shop, a nick-nack-atory.

KNIGHT OF THE BLADE. A bully.

KNIGHT OF THE POST. A false evidence, one that is ready to swear any thing for hire.

KNIGHT OF THE RAINBOW. A footman: from the variety of colours in the liveries and trimming of gentlemen of that cloth.

KNIGHT OF THE ROAD. A highwayman.

KNIGHT OF THE SHEERS. A taylor.

KNIGHT OF THE THIMBLE, or NEEDLE. A taylor or stay-maker.

KNIGHT OF THE WHIP. A coachman.

KNIGHT OF THE TRENCHER. A great eater.

KNIGHT AND BARROW PIG. more hog than gentleman.

KNOWING ONES. Sportsmen on the turf, who from experience and an acquaintance with the jockies, are supposed to be in the secret, that is, to know the true merits or powers of each horse; notwithstanding which it often happens that the knowing ones are taken in.
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Will a genuinely old-fashioned Regency Romance that was actually written 35 years ago-but has only been recently published-that includes a wealthy, slightly older, not-so-helpless fine lady who curses (lightly), regularly insults the hero, knows how to ride, shoot, drink, throw a punch and darn well rescue herself when necessary, suffice?  If so, you might want to check out my Regency Romance novel A Very Merry Chase. Is it great literature for the generations? Probably not-but it is a fun read in the tradition of the comedy of errors/manners vein that will, amuse and entertain. The first chapter is available online for free.
Smiles,
Teresa

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